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instagram:

Ringing in 2014 on Instagram

To see more photos and videos from some of the biggest New Year’s Eve celebrations around the world so far, check out the location pages for the Auckland Sky Tower, Sydney Opera House, Kuala Lumpur City Center Park and Victoria Harbour (維多利亞港).

As the year draws to a close across the timezones, crowds are gathering around the world for firework displays and parties at some of the globe’s most famous landmarks.

Want to see photos and videos from New Year’s Eve celebrations in your city? Try searching your city or landmark’s name on Instagram with a hashtag in front of it (eg. #singapore or #timessquare). If you find a photo or video with a location tag, tap the blue text above the photo or video to see even more.

Jis korng der leng

Jis korng der leng

urbanplannerholic:

The 10 Cities That Are Leading The Way In Urban Sustainability

BOGOTA: URBAN TRANSPORTATION

This city took the Urban Transportation award for its ultra-efficient bus and taxi fleets. Bogota’s Bus Rapid Transit system, launched in 2000, shuttles over 70% of the city’s 7.1 million person population. Future goals include replacing all of the city’s diesel fleet with hybrid and electric buses, electrifying the entire the taxi fleet, and adding a new metro line.

MELBOURNE: ENERGY EFFICIENT BUILT ENVIRONMENT

Melbourne won in the Energy Efficient Built Environment category for a sustainable buildings program that gives building managers and owners financing for energy and water retrofits.

COPENHAGEN: CARBON MEASUREMENT & PLANNING

Copenhagen scooped up the Carbon Measurement & Planning award for its ambitious 2025 Climate Plan—an attempt to make the city completely carbon neutral by 2025. If it succeeds in cutting emissions to 400,000 tons, Copenhagen will be the first carbon neutral capital city in the world.

MEXICO CITY: AIR QUALITY

It may not be the first city that pops into your head when you think about clean air (it was at one point the most polluted city in the world), but Mexico City took the Air Quality award for ProAire, a program that has dramatically cut CO2 emissions and air pollution over the last 20 years through everything from vehicle emissions reductions to containment of urban sprawl. It’s proof that a solid plan can significantly improve air quality.

MUNICH: GREEN ENERGY

Munich received the Green Energy award for its initiative to power the city completely using renewable sources by 2025. So far, the city is 37% of the way there—in 2015, wind projects will cause that number to climb to 80%.

RIO DE JANEIRO: SUSTAINABLE COMMUNITIES

The Morar Carioca Program (an urban revitalization plan) is behind Rio’s win in the Sustainable Communities category. The program aims to “formalize” and re-urbanize all of Rio’s favelas by 2020, with a combination of better landscaping, infrastructure, educational tools, and more—a move that will help with health and wellness for the 20% of the city population that lives in these settlements.

NEW YORK: ADAPTATION & RESILIENCE

New York City won in the Adaptation & Resilience category for its now-famous post-Sandy action plan, dubbed A Stronger, More Resilient New York. The program consists of 250 ambitious infrastructure resilience initiatives across a number of categories, including transportation, telecommunications, parks, insurance, and buildings.

SAN FRANCISCO: WASTE MANAGEMENT

San Francisco took the Waste Management award for an incredibly effective 11-year-old zero waste program, which now sees 80% of all trash diverted from landfills. By 2020, the city hopes to bring that up to 100%—a goal that, as a resident, seems quite possible.

SINGAPORE: INTELLIGENT CITY INFRASTRUCTURE

Singapore is the Intelligent City Infrastructure recipient—an award given for its Intelligent Transport System, which is made up of an amalgam of smart transportation initiatives, like real-time traffic data from GPS-equipped taxis and an electronic road toll collection system. The result: Singapore has lower congestion rates than most cities.

TOKYO: FINANCE & ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

Tokyo won in the Finance & Economic Development category, for its launch of the world’s first cap and trade program in 2010. Today, the program has 1,100 participating facilities, which have cut emissions by a total of 13% in the city and prevented over 7 million tons of CO2 from being released.

Take all of the best qualities of these municipalities—effective road management, cap and trade, sustainable energy, excellent public transportation, a zero waste program, and so on—and you have an urbanist’s dream city. That dream city may not be a reality yet, but the first step to creating one (or many) is learning from cities that already excel in specific areas. Because, while the United States may have a hard time adapting resilience lessons from Japan, New York City might be much more willing to learn from Tokyo.

Useful

Last year, the earth’s population passed the 7 billion mark with about 50% of those people living in cities. While both global population and urbanisation rates have been estimated to rise, of greater significance is that roughly 75% of people will live in cities by 2050. How might this affect the way we move around urban areas in the future? Cities (especially developing cities that are likely to experience the largest boom and strain) will need to think of smarter and more efficient means of transporting citizens.
Rouen Smit on urban transportation. Got an opinion to share? Come join our tweetchat - October 30th at 6PM GMT/2PM EST (via thisbigcity)

razorshapes:

Pravdoliub Ivanov

1. Confusion, 2002

2. Enlightenment, 2008

3. Hope, Hopeful, Hopefulness, 2005